North-Western Basin Branch News

27.02.2018

Three port hydraulic engineering facilities in the seaport of Big Port St Petersburg put under the North-Western Basin Branch management


Under Resolution No 527-r of November 23, 2017 issued by Russia’s Federal Agency for State Property Management Territorial Administration for St Petersburg and the Leningrad region, three port hydraulic engineering facilities have been assigned to FSUE “Rosmorport” on the basis of the right of economic management. Pursuant to FSUE “Rosmorport” Order No 560 of December 22, 2017, the following facilities, which were earlier under management of the Federal State Enterprise “The Directorate of the Protective Facilities Complex of St Petersburg of the Ministry of Construction, Housing and Utilities of the Russian Federation”, have been put under the economic management of North-Western Basin Branch. 
- Northern Kronshtadt Approach Canal through the C-2 navigation pass;
- anchoring Station No 4B;
- western Kronshtadt Canal (the fairway).

The Northern Kronshtadt Approach Canal through the C-2 navigation pass of 16.1 km in length, 110 meters in breadth and design seabed levels of -7±0,2 meters had been built in 2012 and put into operation in 2015. The canal is designed for a design river/sea vessels of the Volga-4001 type with 14 meters in length, 16.7 meters in breadth and 4.5 meters in load draught entering the seaport of Big Port St Petersburg.

Anchoring Station No 4B with a total space of 4.9 km and the actual depth of 8.7-10.7 m was built in 2012 and put into operation in 2013. The anchoring station is designed for mooring of no more than nine design vessels of the Volga-4001 type in waiting for moving through the C-2 navigation pass to moor vessels in the seaport of Big Port St Petersburg.

The western Kronshtadt Canal (the fairway) with 28.4 km in length, 600 meters in breadth and 8.7-25.7 m in actual depths was built in 2010 and put into operation in 2014. The canal is designed for the second entry and exit of Volga-4001 design vessels from the Neva Bay into the Gulf of Finland.

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